THAT HOPE UNSATISFIED IS TO THE

LOVER'S HEART AS A PRO-

LONGED DEATH.2


IABIDE, and abide ; and better abide,
   After the old proverb the happy day
   And ever my Lady to me doth say,
' Let me alone, and I will provide.'
I abide, and abide, and tarry the tide,
And with abiding speed well ye may.
Thus do I abide I wot alway,
N' other obtaining, nor yet denied.
Aye me ! this long abiding
Seemeth to me, as who sayeth
A prolonging of a dying death,
Or a refusing of a desired thing.
    Much were it better for to be plain,
    Than to say, 'Abide,' and yet not obtain.


2  According to Dr. Nott, the allusion in this sonnet is to
Anne Boleyn.




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Text source:
Yeowell, James, Ed. The Poetical Works of Sir Thomas Wyatt.
London: George Bell and Sons, 1904. 20-21.




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Created by Anniina Jokinen on August 25, 2000. Last updated January 21, 2012.








Anne Boleyn Miniature,
Attr. to John Hoskins.