THE LOVER REJOICETH AGAINST

FORTUNE

THAT BY HINDERING HIS SUIT HAD HAPPILY

MADE HIM FORSAKE HIS FOLLY.

IN faith I woth not what to say,
   Thy chances been so wonderous,
   Thou Fortune, with thy divers play
That makest the joyful dolorous,
And eke the same right joyous.
yet thought hty chain hath me enwrapt,
Spite of thy hap, hap hath well hapt.
    Though thou hast set me for a wonder,
And seekest by change to do me pain :
Men's minds yet mayst thou not so order ;
For honesty, if it remain,
Shall shine for all thy cloudy rain.
In vain thou seekest to have me trapped ;
Spite of thy hap, hap hath well hapt.
    In hindering me, me didst thou further ;
And made a gap, where was a stile :
Cruel wills been oft put under ;
Weening to lour, then didst thou smile :
Lord, how thyself thou didst beguile,
That in thy cares wouldst me have wrapt ?
But spite of hap, hap hath well hapt.



Source:
Yeowell, James, Ed. The Poetical Works of Sir Thomas Wyatt.
London: George Bell and Sons, 1904. 38.




Backto the Works of Sir Thomas Wyatt


Site copyright ©1996-2007 Anniina Jokinen. All Rights Reserved.
Created by Anniina Jokinen on August 26, 2000. Last updated January 22, 2007.