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John Bale (1495-1563)

JOHN BALE (1495-1563), Bishop of Ossory, was born at the little village of Cove, near Dunwich in Suffolk, on 21 Nov. 1495. His parents were in a humble rank of life; but at the age of twelve he was sent to the Carmelite convent at Norwich, where he was educated, and thence he passed to Jesus College, Cambridge. He was at first an opponent of the new learning, and was a zealous Roman catholic, but was converted to protestantism by the teaching of Lord Wentworth. He laid aside his monastic habit, renounced his vows, and caused great scandal by taking a wife, of whom nothing is known save that her name was Dorothy. This step exposed him to the hostility of the clergy, and he only escaped punishment by the powerful protection of Thomas Cromwell, Earl of Essex.

He held the living of Thornden in Suffolk, and in 1534 was convened before the archbishop of York to answer for a sermon, denouncing Romish uses, which he had preached at Doncaster. Bale is said to have attracted Cromwell's attention by his dramas, which were moralities, or scriptural plays setting forth the reformed opinions and attacking the Roman party. The earliest of Bale's plays was written in 1538, and its title is sufficiently significant of its general purport. It is called 'A Brefe Comedy or Enterlude of Johan Baptystes Preachynge in the Wyldernesse; openynge the craftye Assaults of the Hypocrytes (i.e. the friars) with the glorious Baptyme of the Lord Jesus Christ' (Harleian Miscellany, vol. i.). Bale wrote several plays of a similar character. They are not remarkable for their poetical merits, but are vigorous attempts to convey his own ideas of religion to the popular mind. When Bale was bishop of Ossory, he had some of his plays acted by boys at the market-cross of Kilkenny on Sunday afternoon.

Cromwell recognised in Bale a man who could strike hard, and Bale continued to make enemies by his unscrupulous outspokenness. The fall of Cromwell betokened a religious reaction, and Bale had too many enemies to stay unprotected in England. He fled in 1540 with his wife and children to Germany, and there he continued his controversial writings. Chief amongst them in importance were the collections of Wycliffite martyrologies, 'A brief Chronicle concerning the Examination and Death of Sir John Oldcastle, collected by John Bale out of the books and writings of those Popish Prelates which were present,' London, 1544; at the end of which was 'The Examination of William Thorpe,' which Foxe attributes to Tyndale. In 1547 Bale published at Marburg 'The Examination of Anne Askewe.' Another work which was the fruit of his exile was an exposure of the monastic system entitled ' The Actes of Englyshe Votaryes,' 1546.

On the accession of Edward VI in 1547 Bale returned to England and shared in the triumph of the more advanced reformers. He was appointed to the rectory of Bishopstoke in Hampshire, and published in London a work which he had composed during his exile, 'The Image of bothe Churches after the most wonderfull and heavenlie Revelacion of Sainct John' (1550). This work may be taken as the best example of Bale's polemical power, showing his learning, his rude vigour of expression, and his want of good taste and moderation.

In 1551 Bale was promoted to the vicarage of Swaffham in Norfolk, but he does not appear to have resided there. In August 1552 Edward VI came to Southampton and met Bale, whom he presented to the vacant see of Ossory. In December Bale set out for Ireland, and was consecrated at Dublin on 2 Feb. 1553. From the beginning Bale showed himself an uncompromising upholder of the reformation doctrines. His consecration gave rise to a controversy. The Irish bishops had not yet accepted the new ritual. The 'Form of Consecrating Bishops,' adopted by the English parliament, had not received the sanction of the Irish parliament, and was not binding in Ireland. Bale refused to be ordained by the Roman ritual, and at length succeeded in carrying his point, though a protest was made by the Dean of Dublin during the ceremony.

Bale has left an account of his proceedings in his diocese in his 'Vocacyon of John Bale to the Byshopperycke of Ossorie' (Harleian Miscellany, vol. vi.). His own account shows that his zeal for the reformation was not tempered by discretion. At Kilkenny he tried to remove 'idolatries,' and thereon followed 'angers, slaunders, conspiracies, and in the end slaughters of men.' He angered the priests by denouncing their superstitions and advising them to marry. His extreme measures everywhere aroused opposition. When Edward VI's death was known, Bale doubted about recognising Lady Jane Grey, and on the proclamation of Queen Mary he preached at Kilkenny on the duty of obedience.

But the catholic party at once raised its head. The mass was restored in the cathedral, and Bale thought it best to withdraw to Dublin, whence he set sail for Holland. He was taken prisoner by the captain of a Dutch man-of-war, which was driven by stress of weather to St. Ives in Cornwall. There Bale was apprehended on a charge of high treason, but was released. The same fortune befell him at Dover. When he arrived in Holland he was again imprisoned, and only escaped by paying £300.1 From Holland he made his way to Basel, where he remained in quiet till the accession of Elizabeth in 1559. He again returned to England an old and worn-out man. He did not feel himself equal to the task of returning to his turbulent diocese of Ossory, but accepted the post of prebendary of Canterbury, and died in Canterbury in 1563.

Bale was a man of great theological and historical learning, and of an active mind. But he was a coarse and bitter controversialist and awakened equal bitterness amongst his opponents. None of the writers of the reformation time in England equalled Bale in acerbity. He was known as 'Bilious Bale.' His controversial spirit was a hindrance to his learning, as he was led away by his prejudices into frequent misstatements. The most important work of Bale was a history of English literature, which first appeared in 1548 under the title 'Illustrium Majoris Britanniae Scriptorum Summarium in quinque centurias divisum.' It is a valuable catalogue of the writings of the authors of Great Britain chronologically arranged. Bale's second exile gave him time to carry on his work till his own day, and two editions were issued in Basel, 1557-1559. This work owes much to the 'Collectanea' and 'Commentarii' of John Leland, and is disfigured by misrepresentations and inaccuracies. Still its learning is considerable, and it deserves independent consideration, as it was founded on an examinat ion of manuscripts in monastic libraries, many of which have since been lost.

The plays of Bale are doggerel, and are totally wanting in decorum. A few of them are printed in Dodsley's 'Old Plays,' vol. i., and in the 'Harleian Miscellany,' vol. i. The most interesting of his plays, 'Kynge Johan', was printed by the Camden Society in 1838. It is a singular mixture of history and allegory, the events of the reign of John being transferred to the struggle between protestantism and popery in the writer's own day. His polemical writings were very numerous, and many of them were published under assumed names. Tanner (Bibl. Brit.) gives a catalogue of eighty-five printed and manuscript works attributed to Bale, and Cooper (Athenae Cantabrigienses) extends the number to ninety.

Besides Bale's works above mentioned, the following are the most important: 1. 'Acta Romanorum Pontificum usque ad tempora Pauli IV,' Basle, 8vo, 1538; Frankfort, 1567; Leyden, 1615. 2. 'The Pageant of the Popes, containing the lyves of all the Bishops of Rome from the beginning to the yeare 1555, Englished with additions by J. S. [John Studley],' London, 1574. 3. 'A Tragedie or Enterlude manifesting the chiefe promises of God unto man, by all ages in the olde lawe from the fall of Adam to the Incarnation of the Lord Jesus Christe,' 1538, reprinted in Dodsley. 4. 'New Comedy or Enterlude concerning the three lawes of Nature, Moises and Christe, corrupted by the Sodomytes, Pharyses and Papistes,' 1538, London, 1562. 5. 'Yet a Course at the Romyshe Foxe,' Zurich, 1543. 6. 'A Mysterye of Iniquyte, contayned within the heretycall Genealogye of Ponce Pantolabus, is here both dysclosed and confuted,' Geneva, 1545. 7. 'The Apologye of Johan Bale agaynste a ranke Papyst,' 1550.


— Mandell Creighton.






1. £300 in 1553 was equivalent to £75,000 in 2008. Source: Measuring Worth.



Source:

Creighton, Mandell. "John Bale."
The Dictionary of National Biography. Vol III. Leslie Stephen, Ed.
London: Smith, Elder, & Co., 1885. 41-42.




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